bhighsmith

Changing of the Guard

By Jake Freivald

Jake here.

I founded Flash Fiction Online in December of 2007. Flash fiction itself was just gaining steam, and it looked like there was an opportunity for a professional market dedicated to flash. I’m happy that we — me, yes, but alongside a team of volunteers who rallied around the concept — created that market and kept it going for five-plus years.

About two years ago — has it been two years yet? It’s pretty much impossible for me to tell — I passed editorial leadership to Suzanne Vincent, a talented author and judge of stories. She will continue in the Editor-in-Chief role. I’m now also handing off the publisher / CFO role to Anna Yeats. If I already owe you money (believe me, I know it’s possible), contact me; for anything else, contact Suzanne or Anna. :) From this point forward, anything I do with FFO will have the title “emeritus” attached to it. And for all that I love flash fiction, that’s a relief.

I’d like to thank the volunteers on the Flash Fiction Online staff, past and present, who have done so much to keep the magazine moving forward. I literally can’t thank them enough. They do the work for the love of literature, and to make wonderful things happen. I trust that they, Anna, and Suzanne will continue to bring you flashes of beauty and insight.

 

SF Great Frederik Pohl Dies at 93

To paraphrase an IO9 commentor, the dual Nebula/Hugo choice for Frederik Pohl’s SF novel, Gateway, was simply dreadful…in the sense of instilling deep dread in the reader, as any horror writer would wish to do. Pohl won three Hugos, in successive years. That says it all, doesn’t it? Oh, and another Hugo and three Nebulas, a W. Cambell, and a National Book Award. And others.

 

Self-Publishing Super Hero–William Blake

Venerable poet William Blake, author of sometimes mysterious and sometimes brilliantly simple works, was a self-publishing super hero who might serve as an inspiration to would-be self-publishers. He’s perhaps best known for his illuminated “Songs of Innocence” (example plate below) and “Songs of Experience.”

The Lamb–Example Relief Etch, Hand-Painted
Image in public domain according to Wikipedia, from which it came.
Notifiy Flash Fiction Online if you believe it is not in the public domain.

He had a soup-to-nuts approach to publishing, illustrated by the unpoetic list below:

  • wrote the poems
  • created a new printing technique, relief etching, whereby the illustrations’ line art and text were etched on copper plates in reverse, whereby the negative and color spaces were etched away. (This is in opposition to the practice of making plates for each color.)
  • printed the pages on the printing press in his living room.
  • hand-colored each illustration, making each copy unique.
  • bound the books and mailed them to his customers.
  • marketed them, somehow, in the late 18th century.

If you see an original Blake publication at a garage sale, pick it up. It would be considered a museum piece. Then you can sell it and make the transition from waiter/writer to writer.

 

Publications by FFO Alumni for 2012

Flash Fiction Online alumni (authors who published previously at FFO) may add news of their publications at other venues for 2012 to the list below. Post your news in a comment to this post or contact the editor. Your comment won’t be posted; the news be added to this post.

FFO Alumni who published elsewhere in 2012:

Zach Shephard

 

Odyssey Writing Workshop–Summer 2013

Barbara Barnett-Stewart, Flash Fiction Online alumnus and Odyssey publicist, announced the Odyssey Writing Workshop’s summer 2013 session.

According to their press release:

Since its founding in 1996, Odyssey has become one of the most respected workshops in the fantasy, science fiction, and horror writing community.  Odyssey is for developing writers whose work is approaching publication quality and for published writers who want to improve their work.  The six-week workshop combines advanced lectures, exercises, extensive writing, and in-depth feedback on student manuscripts.  Top authors, editors, and agents have served as guest lecturers, including George R. R. Martin, Harlan Ellison, Jane Yolen, Terry Brooks, Robert J. Sawyer, Ben Bova, Nancy Kress, Elizabeth Hand, Jeff VanderMeer, Donald Maass, Sheila Williams, Shawna McCarthy, Carrie Vaughn, and Dan Simmons.  Fifty-eight percent of Odyssey graduates go on to professional publication.

The program is held every summer on Saint Anselm College’s beautiful campus in Manchester, NH.  Saint Anselm is one of the finest liberal arts colleges in the country, dedicated to excellence in education, and its campus provides a peaceful setting and state-of-the-art facilities for Odyssey students.  College credit is available upon request.

Jeanne Cavelos, Odyssey’s director and primary instructor, is a best-selling author and a former senior editor at Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing, where she won the World Fantasy Award for her work.  As an editor, Cavelos gained a reputation for discovering and nurturing new writers.  She provides students with detailed, concrete, constructive critiques of their work.  Cavelos said, “I’ve worked with many different writers, and I know that each writer thinks and works differently.  We limit attendance at Odyssey to sixteen, so I can become deeply familiar with the work of each student and provide assessments of strengths and weaknesses.  I work individually with each student, helping each to find the best writing process for him, suggesting specific tools to target weaknesses, and charting progress over the six weeks.”  Her critiques average over 1,200 words, and her handwritten line edits on manuscripts are extensive.

Odyssey class time is split between workshopping sessions and lectures.  An advanced, comprehensive curriculum covers the elements of fiction writing in depth.  While feedback reveals the weaknesses in students’ manuscripts, lectures teach the tools and techniques necessary to strengthen them.

The workshop runs from June 10 to July 19, 2013.  Class meets for four hours in the morning, five days a week.  Students spend about eight hours more per day writing and critiquing each other’s work.  Prospective students, aged eighteen and up, apply from all over the world.  The early action application deadline is January 31, and the regular admission deadline is April 8. Tuition is $1,920, and housing is $790 for a double room in a campus apartment and $1,580 for a single room.

Go here for more information.