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Archive for the ‘Classic Flash’ Category

“Egocentric Orbit” by John Cory

Sunburst over Earth, courtesy of NASA and Wikimedia Commons.
Sunburst over Earth, courtesy of NASA and Wikimedia Commons.

Near the end of his fifteenth orbit as Greenland slipped by noiselessly below, he made the routine measurements that tested the operation of his space capsule and checked the automatic instruments which would transmit their stored data to Earth on his next pass over Control. Everything normal; all mechanical devices were operating perfectly.

This information didn’t surprise him, in fact, he really didn’t even think about it. The previous orbits and the long simulated flights on Earth during training had made such checks routine and perfect results expected. The capsules were developed by exhaustive testing both on the ground and as empty satellites before entrusting them to carry animals and then the first human. (more…)

“A Bivouac of the Dead” by Ambrose Bierce

ambrose-bierceAway up in the heart of the Allegheny mountains, in Pocahontas county, West Virginia, is a beautiful little valley through which flows the east fork of the Greenbrier river. At a point where the valley road intersects the old Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike, a famous thoroughfare in its day, is a post office in a farm house. The name of the place is Travelers’ Repose, for it was once a tavern. Crowning some low hills within a stone’s throw of the house are long lines of old Confederate fortifications, skilfully designed and so well “preserved” that an hour’s work by a brigade would put them into serviceable shape for the next civil war. This place had its battle — what was called a battle in the “green and salad days” of the great rebellion. (more…)

“The Model Husband Contest” from Punch

SCENE THE FIRST—At the GALAHAD-GREENS’.

Mrs. G.-G. GALAHAD!

Mr. G.-G. (meekly). My love?

Mrs. G.-G. I see that the proprietors of All Sorts are going to follow the American example, and offer a prize of £20 to the wife who makes out the best case for her husband as a Model. It’s just as well, perhaps, that you should know that I’ve made up my mind to enter you!

Mr. G.-G. (gratified). My dear CORNELIA! really, I’d no idea you had such a—

Mrs. G.-G. Nonsense! The drawing-room carpet is a perfect disgrace, and, as you can’t, or won’t, provide the money in any other way, why—Would you like to hear what I’ve said about you? (more…)

Classic Flash: “Violets” by Alice Dunbar Nelson

I.

“And she tied a bunch of violets with a tress of her pretty brown hair.”

She sat in the yellow glow of the lamplight softly humming these words. It was Easter evening, and the newly risen spring world was slowly sinking to a gentle, rosy, opalescent slumber, sweetly tired of the joy which had pervaded it all day. For in the dawn of the perfect morn, it had arisen, stretched out its arms in glorious happiness to greet the Saviour and said its hallelujahs, merrily trilling out carols of bird, and organ and flower-song. But the evening had come, and rest.

There was a letter lying on the table, it read:

(more…)

“A Young Turkish Catastrophe in Two Scenes” by Saki

The Minister for Fine Arts (to whose Department had been lately added the new sub-section of Electoral Engineering) paid a business visit to the Grand Vizier. According to Eastern etiquette they discoursed for a while on indifferent subjects. The minister only checked himself in time from making a passing reference to the Marathon Race, remembering that the Vizier had a Persian grandmother and might consider any allusion to Marathon as somewhat tactless. Presently the Minister broached the subject of his interview.

“Under the new Constitution are women to have votes?” he asked suddenly.

(more…)

Flash Fiction Online in the News

Worlds Beyond (“News and reviews for the geek in all of us”) liked the current FFO issue’s subversive  Zombie Walk, linking to it on their Flash Friday page.

Sam Tomaino at SFRevu has reviewed Flash Fiction Online’s October 2012 issue, which has two original and one classic flash stories, including:

  • Zombie March Tension by Brynn MacNabb,
  • Mid-Autumn Moon by Lani Carroll, and
  • Classic Flash: A Fratricide by Franz Kafka

Speaking of Mid-Autumn Moon, Sam said, “A wonderfully quirky tale.”

See Sam’s other short fiction reviews here.

 

Allegory and Symbolism

Mark, a member of the editorial team, enjoyed Boleslaw Prus’s Mold of the Earth quite a bit. It highlighted something interesting about the relationship of allegory and symbolism.

He wrote an essay about that relationship, and I liked it enough to publish it, so here it is.

Hemingway as a Flash Fiction Writer

Guy Hogan has been encouraging us here at FFO since the day we went live — thanks very much, Guy.

He runs a blog at http://flashfictionnow.blogspot.com, and I want to highlight one really interesting thing he’s doing: picking apart Hemingway as a flash writer. You can find the Hemingway series tagged here:

http://flashfictionnow.blogspot.com/search/label/Hemingway

I especially like entry #7.

Nice work, Guy!

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